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  1. Hijabs & Khimars

    Hijab is an Arabic word meaning barrier or partition.

    In Islam, however, it has a broader meaning. It is the principle of modesty and includes behaviour as well as dress for both males and females.

    The most visible form of hijab is the head covering that many Muslim women wear. Hijab however goes beyond the head scarf. In one popular school of Islamic thought, hijab refers to the complete covering of everything except the hands, face and feet in long, loose and non see-through garments. A woman who wears hijab is called Muhaajaba.

    Modesty rules are open to a wide range of interpretations. Some Muslim women wear full-body garments that only expose their eyes. Some cover every part of the body except their face and hands. Some believe only their hair or their cleavage is compulsory to hide, and others do not observe any special dress rules.

    In the English speaking world, use of the word hijab has become limited to mean the covering on the

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  2. What is an Abaya?

    Abaya which is an Arabic word for ‘Cloak’ is a simple, loose over-garment worn by some women in parts of the Muslim world. This is how Wikipedia defines this word literally but being in this business for some time, I have come to two different conclusions which contradict with ‘Wike-Abaya-Definition’.

    One that Abaya is worn across the globe, though people call it with different names in different regions. For example, in India, most of the people still call it Burqa. But when you call it “Burqa’’ or “Niquab” it automatically means a ‘Loose Black Islamic Clothing’ which covers your whole body and your curves are not noticeable.

    That’s my second point where I differ from ‘Wike-Abaya-Definition’. Abaya these days does not means a Burqa or Niquab and it is not only worn by Muslims alone. Abaya is just a Modest Clothing for women and it has nothing to do with Islam. I ll say that it is a ‘Fusion’ of Burqa and Western Dresses and it is being liked and worn by people of all

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